Dating someone with testicular cancer

dating someone with testicular cancer

Does testicular cancer affect sex life and fertility?

Treatment for testicular cancer does not affect your ability to have sex but it may affect your fertility or reduce your sex drive. This is usually temporary. It is normal to worry about the possible effects of testicular cancer and its treatment on your sex life and fertility. Fertility is being able to make someone pregnant.

Can I date if I have cancer?

Keep in mind that dating is not always easy (even without a cancer diagnosis). If you are having trouble navigating the complex issues that often arise with cancer and dating, it may be helpful to reach out to a licensed oncology social worker. Cancer Care ’s licensed oncology social workers can help anyone affected by cancer, free of charge.

How can I find out more about dating and cancer?

If you are having trouble navigating the complex issues that often arise with cancer and dating, it may be helpful to reach out to a licensed oncology social worker. Cancer Care ’s licensed oncology social workers can help anyone affected by cancer, free of charge. To speak with a licensed oncology social worker, call 800-813-HOPE (4673).

Can I make someone pregnant after testicular cancer treatment?

You will usually still be able to make someone pregnant after testicular cancer treatment. But some peoples fertility may be affected. This can depend on the type and amount of treatment you have. Your specialist can give you more information about this.

Can you have a baby after testicular cancer?

Most men who try to father a child after testicular cancer treatment eventually succeed, new research shows. More intensive chemotherapy treatments may lengthen the process, Norwegian researchers report in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Can testicular cancer make you infertile?

Testicular cancer or its treatment can make you infertile (unable to father a child). Before treatment starts, men who might want to father children may consider storing sperm in a sperm bank for later use. But testicular cancer also can cause low sperm counts, which could make it hard to get a good sample.

Should testicular cancer patients consider sperm banking?

Many testicular cancer survivors fathered children without using sperm they had banked before cancer treatment. However, all patients with testicular cancer who wish to maintain fertility (and who do not require emergent treatment) should be counseled and offered the option of sperm banking, states an editorial in the journal.

Can a testicular cancer survivor become a father?

Researchers tracked fatherhood in more than 1,800 testicular cancer survivors. The men completed surveys about their marital status and family plans. They were followed for 11 years, on average. A total of 554 men said they tried to father a child after their cancer treatment. More than two-thirds (68%) succeeded at becoming biological fathers.

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