Dating vintage gibson pots

dating vintage gibson pots

Are all Gibson pots the same?

As always with Gibson, there a probably many vintage guitars that dont conform to the catalog descriptions, which are often incomplete and may even contain errors. Gibson pots are NOT all the same.

What are pot codes and how do you date a guitar?

If youve been reading articles about dating a vintage guitar, you may well have come across mention of pot codes, and the concept of using pot codes to date your guitar. The pots, or potentiometers to give their full name, are the variable resistors that control volume and tone.

What is the Gibson pot database?

This website uses cookies to personalise content and adverts, to provide social media features, and to analyse traffic. Learn more This Gibson pot database contains part numbers with respective models for all Gibsons from the early 1960s until the early 1980s as described in the various replacement parts lists distributed by Gibson.

What do the numbers on a Gibson pot code mean?

One is the manufacturers id code with date, and another is the Gibson part number. The manufacturers code has six (1950s) or seven digits, starting with 137 (CTS) or 134 (Centralab), and ending in format y/ww or yy/ww [where y is the year, and w is the week of the year]. For more information on Gibson pot codes (and others), see Reading Pot Codes

Are all Gibson potentiometers the same?

As always with Gibson, there a probably many vintage guitars that dont conform to the catalog descriptions, which are often incomplete and may even contain errors. Gibson pots are NOT all the same. Most 60s-70s Gibson potentiometers were made by CTS (Chicago Telephone Company), although other manufacturers did also supply pots to Gibson.

What is the Gibson pot database?

This website uses cookies to personalise content and adverts, to provide social media features, and to analyse traffic. Learn more This Gibson pot database contains part numbers with respective models for all Gibsons from the early 1960s until the early 1980s as described in the various replacement parts lists distributed by Gibson.

How many digits are in a Gibson pot code?

The manufacturers code has six (1950s) or seven digits, starting with 137 (CTS) or 134 (Centralab), and ending in format y/ww or yy/ww [where y is the year, and w is the week of the year]. For more information on Gibson pot codes (and others), see Reading Pot Codes

What is the best replacement for a 1968 Gibson Les Paul?

(2) 1969 CTS Split Shaft 500k Potentiometer For Gibson Les Paul, ES335, SG, SG Jr or Melody Maker guitars. These could also pass as correct replacements for Gibson guitars with late 1968 serial numbers due to the random delays in final assemblies with Gibson.

What numbers did Gibson use in the pot case?

The basic companies Gibson used were IRC ,CTS , Central Lab. IRC used (615) code to begin the sequence of numbers on the pot case . Central Lab used ( 134 )and CTS used (137) codes. The way to ready a pot code is as follows . There are several scenarios. IRC always began with 615 xxxxx 354 .

What do the numbers on a parts number on a pot mean?

Pots usually have several identification numbers. One is the manufacturers id code with date, and another is the Gibson part number. The manufacturers code has six (1950s) or seven digits, starting with 137 (CTS) or 134 (Centralab), and ending in format y/ww or yy/ww [where y is the year, and w is the week of the year].

What does the 4th digit mean on a pot code?

The 4th is the last digit of the year the pot was made between 1947 and 1959. These correspond to the last 2 digits of the year of manufacture. These represent the week of the year of manufacture (01-52). If the last 2 numbers are higher than 52, it is not a pot code, but is probably a part number.

How to read guitar pot codes?

Reading pot codes 1 Part numbers. Many pots do not have part numbers, but the larger guitar manufacturers did list pots by part number in their spare parts manuals. 2 Manufacturers codes. ... 3 Production dates. ... 4 Resistance values and taper. ...

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