Hook up shower drain

hook up shower drain

How to install a shower drain trap?

The steps to installing a shower drain trap are as follows: 1. Cut the subfloor around the drain Use an electric saw to cut the subfloor around the drain of your bathroom. Cut it such that it’s 12 by 12 inches. The section cut should be above the floor boards to allow you to nail back the subfloor when you’re done.

Do you connect toilet to shower or drain?

As such, it makes much more practical sense to connect everything to the toilet drain. As with the shower, any pipes running horizontally from the toilet toward the vent or the main vertical sewage pipe should have a slight gradient of between 1/4 and 1/2 inches per foot.

How do you replace a shower drain?

Use plastic drain pipe and fittings, either PVC or ABS, for the new shower drain. Turn off the water lines to the area youll be working on. Locate the existing drain, and determine the spot where you want to connect the new shower drain. If youre attaching to a horizontally run pipe, you will use a wye-type fitting to connect to it.

Why is my shower not draining?

The drain trap is the main mechanism that keeps sewer gases from leaking back into your home. The U-shaped bend keeps a layer of standing water as a barrier to sewer gases. The drain trap can get clogged and prevent your shower from draining. If this happens, you need to remove the drain trap and clear it out.

How do you install a P trap in a shower drain?

Hold the p-trap in place where it will rest when you are finished, and measure the length of PVC pipes you will need to connect the drain and p-trap to the shower. You may have to use PVC elbow fittings to make any directional changes in the drain to line up the p-trap properly with the shower drain outlet.

What is the purpose of a shower drain trap?

Another purpose of a trap is to collect sediment before it passes through and into the sewer. A shower p-trap and drain will be either 1 1/2- or 2-inch diameter pipe. Cut the existing drain line that you want to connect the shower drain to by using a hack saw or power saber saw with a fine tooth blade.

How do you connect a shower drain to an existing drain?

Cut the existing drain line that you want to connect the shower drain to by using a hack saw or power saber saw with a fine tooth blade. Use a cloth or file to remove any burrs from the cut end of the pipe. Place a rubber coupling with stainless steel compression bands on the existing drain and slide it on about half the length of the coupling.

Do You need A P-trap for a shower drain?

A P-trap for the shower drain is a legal requirement in the United States and many other countries around the world. The shower pee trap helps keep awful gases away from the shower. Besides that, it keeps animals and other items from going back up into the home given its shape and design.

Why is my shower draining so slow?

Partial clogs limit water flow and are likely to get worse with time. Vent issue: This may surprise you, but plumbing systems have vents. They need vents to release the air pressure generated by water as it drains out. If your show drain vent becomes clogged or partly clogged, your shower will drain much slower.

How do I know if my shower drain is clogged?

If the water doesn’t flow quickly and smoothly down the shower drain, but pools up around your feet instead, then you have a clogged shower drain. At first you may not notice the water draining slowly, but eventually you will have a problem on your hands when it won’t drain at all. When you have a clogged shower drain, you have a couple of choices.

What should you not put down your shower drain?

Second, don’t pour food, chemicals, or other substances down your shower drain. Soap, conditioner and water are the only things your shower drain should have to handle.

Why is my shower water stuck in the bottom?

Partial clog issue: If your shower drain were completely clogged, then your shower water would be completely stuck. When you have a slow drain, it’s a sign that a clog is developing. Partial clogs limit water flow and are likely to get worse with time. Vent issue: This may surprise you, but plumbing systems have vents.

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