Dating ludwig snare drums

dating ludwig snare drums

How do I find the date on a Ludwig drum?

Many Ludwig drums, including main line (Keystone and Blue/Olive Badges) and Standards, have dates stamped inside their shells or on paper labels. In the 1999-2005 time frame, several guides were published which report known serial number and date stamp combinations and/or show the general relationship between serial number and date.*

How many Ludwig Drums have been recorded?

As of December 10, 2013, 472 drums are recorded, with 75 reliable reports of drums with both serial numbers and date stamps, There are 20 drums with serial numbers and labels with date codes. Special thanks to collector Kevin Oppendike for sharing his knowledge of Ludwig Standards.

How did we begin the process of indexing Ludwig drums?

We began in the late 1980’s by monitoring all of the 60’s Ludwig drums that came into our shop. Thanks to the production boom of the 60’s, we had a large sampling of drums which provided enough data to do our research. When we found a drum with both a serial number and complete date stamp present, this data was entered into a serial number index.

What are the different parts of the Ludwig dating guide?

It is broken down into five parts: Part I - Current Guides, Part II - New Dating Guides for 1963-1984, Part III - Tracking Changes in Physical Characteristics, Part IV - Dating Guide for Ludwig Standards 1968-1973, and Part V - Date Codes from 1971/72 Era. Released in December 2013.

How many Ludwig Drums have serial numbers and date stamps?

As of December 10, 2013, a database of 1,442 reliable reports of serial numbers and date stamps from the main line of Ludwig drums has been compiled. Fifty-eight have date stamps but badges without serial numbers and 120 additional drums have serial numbers and Date Codes.

How can I tell how old a Ludwig drum is?

Date stamps are simultaneously the best and worst means to properly date a Ludwig drum from the 60s (use of the date stamp was discontinued ca. 1970 with the introduction of the “Blue & Olive” badge). A drum was stamped when the shell was finished, providing the most accurate depiction of the age of wood due to the fact final assembly came later.

How did we begin the process of indexing Ludwig drums?

We began in the late 1980’s by monitoring all of the 60’s Ludwig drums that came into our shop. Thanks to the production boom of the 60’s, we had a large sampling of drums which provided enough data to do our research. When we found a drum with both a serial number and complete date stamp present, this data was entered into a serial number index.

How do I identify a Ludwig?

In this article, we’ll be looking at the three best ways to identify a Ludwig: date stamp, serial number/badge style and shell construction. Forenote:The first two means of indication, date stamp and serial number/badge style, are the two most accurate for identifying the correct year of production.

Is there a Ludwig serial number dating guide?

Regardless, there are three different Ludwig Serial Number dating guides, drum badge dating guides and all sorts of Ludwig History. Just follow the links below

How do I identify a Ludwig?

In this article, we’ll be looking at the three best ways to identify a Ludwig: date stamp, serial number/badge style and shell construction. Forenote:The first two means of indication, date stamp and serial number/badge style, are the two most accurate for identifying the correct year of production.

How do I find the date on a Ludwig drum?

Many Ludwig drums, including main line (Keystone and Blue/Olive Badges) and Standards, have dates stamped inside their shells or on paper labels. In the 1999-2005 time frame, several guides were published which report known serial number and date stamp combinations and/or show the general relationship between serial number and date.*

Are Ludwig standards any good?

Many players seeking the vintage Ludwig sound find Standards to be affordable alternatives to the more expensive main line of Ludwig drums. Although Standards were marketed as second line drums, the wood shells were the same as used on the main line of drums.

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